The Power of Waves

We are connected to waves of water, air and light in a myriad of ways. For many of us though it is the timeless and reassuring rhythm of the ocean that fires our imagination. Both friend and foe, ocean waves embody the energy imparted by wind and earth. Humans directly experience the power of waves through wave watching, surfing, swimming, storms and tsunamis. We capture, create and contemplate images and sounds of waves to forge connections in a different way. As a measure of human ingenuity, the power of waves is now also being used for renewable energy production. Using the form of a photo essay, this post explores ocean waves through their varied elemental expressions – water, wind, earth(quakes), fire (energy) and consciousness.

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Dragons, forces of nature

Dragons have us captivated. Mysterious, magical, embodiments of energy, they have been referred to throughout history in one form or another across diverse cultures. They still feature today in areas such as art, music, film, television, festivals, Magic, Feng Shui, Apps, national flags and astrology. October 24th 2015 marked the second World Dragon Day with events held around the globe. Dragons and the elements are closely connected – this post shares a selection of stories about this relationship with a focus on East Asia and Europe.

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Elemental ecology revisited

‘Elemental ecology’ was coined in 1968 by Professor Bill Jackson, a Tasmanian academic. It was captured for prosperity in his scientific publication ‘Fire, air, water and earth – An elemental ecology of Tasmania.’ This time last year I was preparing a spoken paper for the Ecological Society of Australia (ESA) conference that would revisit Bill’s concept. My first post on elemental ecology was written before the presentation, this one provides an update 12 months on.

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The Year of the (Yin Green Wooden) Sheep

We are almost half way through the Oriental Year of the Sheep, or Year of the Goat, or Year of the Ram. The Chinese character yang (羊), which represents this year in the Zodiac cycle, can be translated as all of these animals. In Japan the yang character represents only one animal, the sheep. In Australia we also refer to 2015 as the Year of the Sheep. Not because we have studied the astrological intricacies of this year, in the main. It’s due to the long association of the post-colonial Australian psyche and economy with domestic sheep. Who would have thought the animal zodiac could be so culturally influenced? And what has it to do with the elements? It’s a fascinating story……

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Neuroconservation, the brain on fire

For my 50th post I would like to reflect on the emerging field of neuroconservation in the context of the intuitive elements – earth, air, fire, water, ether/spirit, metal, wood and consciousness. Dr Wallace J. Nichols, the author of Blue Mind, coined the term neuroconservation to describe the convergence of neuroscience and conservation biology. In one word he has tried to capture the fundamental connections our brains have with nature – personal, ancient and emotional connections – with a focus on the benefits of clean, healthy waterways. Dr Nicholls implicitly contends that of the elements, our relationship to water is paramount. While this raises some questions in my mind, his ideas and activities have certainly generated considerable interest. Including from myself.

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Popularising the periodic table

In 1959 the mathematics lecturer and musical humourist Tom Lehrer wrote a song titled ‘The Elements’. The song refers to the chemical elements, the ones that are classified in the periodic table. The opening lines are “There’s antimony, arsenic, aluminium, selenium; And hydrogen and oxygen and nitrogen and helium”. Sung to the tune of the Major-General’s Song from The Pirates of Penzance, ‘The Elements’ has popped up in all sorts of places since it was composed. There have been many other attempts to popularise the chemical elements since 1959 including giving them personalities, showing them in action and translating them into art works. These efforts are educational, entertaining and worth further examination.

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Humans, the fifth planetary force

How Earth Made Us’ is a ground-breaking BBC series that tells ‘the incredible story of the natural forces that have shaped our history’. Now available on YouTube, it is well worth watching, offering fantastic imagery and though-provoking commentary. Presented by Professor Iain Stewart, the series examines the influence of four fundamental elements – Water, Deep Earth, Wind and Fire – on human history. The fifth and final episode, called the Human Planet, presents humans as a natural force in their own right.

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Being well, with help from the elements

At the start of a new year, many people’s thoughts turn to how they can improve their wellbeing over the coming months. Certainly mine do. In addition to being inspired by beautiful views, enjoying the calming effect of water or warming ourselves with fire there are many other ways the elements can help us to be well.

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Unlocking the hidden messages in water

This post is dedicated to Masaru Emoto, the author of ‘The Hidden Messages in Water’, who died 10 days ago. His book on the impact of different types of energy on water was embraced by many and criticized by others, mostly scientists. Regardless of the response, his observations about water opened a new dimension to this amazing element.

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