Catching up on the elements

It dawned on me today that it has been three months since I wrote a post on FireupWaterdown, my blog that explores the elements across the globe. Where has the time gone! Over that period I have written some posts on my ‘sister’ blog ‘Elemental Japan’ (elementaljapan.com), which I’d recommend visiting. Whether or not you have a specific interest in the elements in Japan, I like to think that you will find something to captivate you. Elsewhere in the world there are many elemental topics and events to catch up on. Like the upcoming extreme ice marathon in Siberia in January 2017. It builds perfectly on my most recent post ‘The cool dude on the bike‘. Then there was the spectacular sunrise over Hobart this morning and the sunset over kunanyi/Mt Wellington the other night. What glorious reminders of the elemental nature of our lives. Plus I’ve come across some stimulating ideas about representing and connecting with the elements through art. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg, so to speak. Continue reading

Let’s celebrate!

There is so much humans have in common. It’s worth celebrating. Along with music and dance, the elements represent a universal language that connects us. These languages nurture shared experiences and provide a means to communicate with others across the globe, and beyond….

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Metal, the evolving element

Gongs and cymbals of all sizes and styles were a feature of MOFO (MONA FOMA)– an arts extravaganza I attended over the weekend in Hobart, Tasmania. As well as being a joy to listen to, these instruments gave me a new perspective on the elemental aspects of metal. So now music making joins Chinese philosophy, the chemical elements, alchemy, blacksmithing, sword-smithing, sculpting and jewelry-making in the fascinating story of metal.

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Popularising the periodic table

In 1959 the mathematics lecturer and musical humourist Tom Lehrer wrote a song titled ‘The Elements’. The song refers to the chemical elements, the ones that are classified in the periodic table. The opening lines are “There’s antimony, arsenic, aluminium, selenium; And hydrogen and oxygen and nitrogen and helium”. Sung to the tune of the Major-General’s Song from The Pirates of Penzance, ‘The Elements’ has popped up in all sorts of places since it was composed. There have been many other attempts to popularise the chemical elements since 1959 including giving them personalities, showing them in action and translating them into art works. These efforts are educational, entertaining and worth further examination.

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The way of the drum

Drums have been used by virtually all cultures. They are an instrument of the elements, being connected to earth, air, fire and water and spirit. Their beat is likened to a throbbing heart, evoking many powerful forms of energy. Their round shape felt to represent nature, Mother Earth, the Universe and the divine. They are commonly reported by Indigenous people to influence weather conditions through the vibrations sent into the atmosphere. Drumming is known to be good for our physical and mental health. Some say it is in our DNA. My sister and I have certainly developed a passion for it.

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The Russian Firebird – a symbol of inspiration and art

One of the delights of undertaking research on the intuitive elements are discoveries that open up new worlds. Recently I came across a miniature-lacquered plate in a second-hand shop. This most unusual object led me to Russia, magic and the exquisite imagery and symbolism of the Firebird.

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Seven elements, plus one

The Rivered Earth contains four libretti written by Vikram Seth, a celebrated Indian novelist and poet, designed to be set to music by Alec Roth. The final libretti is called ‘Seven Elements’. It is a song cycle that includes seven poems – Earth, Air, Wood, Fire, Metal, Water and Space.

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